Tag Archives: Bloggers

Let the watching begin…

“Those who can’t, teach.”

I wish you knew how much pain that statement causes teachers on a daily basis. Being an educator, I know their pain and have felt it all too many times.

Not only is this statement completely false, but it is offensive to anyone who has had their life touched by an educator, which is pretty much all of us.

So what does this have to do with my new blog, “Scoreboard Watching”? Well, for years I’ve done a lot of watching. I’ve watched sports, yes, but for the most part I have watched life. I’ve seen several of my students do extraordinary things, I’ve observed media coverage both good and bad, I’ve watched my fantasy football teams choke time after time in the playoffs and I’ve checked out every sportswriter I can get my eyes on.

Over the course of my career of watching, I’ve come to realize that my opinions can be classified as “off the beaten path,” “unorthodox” or whatever cliché fits best. I’ve realized that I can make a pretty good case for myself on a variety of topics and that my breadth of sports knowledge is fairly impressive.

As a media teacher, I have had the opportunity to teach the tenets of good journalism, both in print and broadcast. My two programs at the high school where I teach have had immense success and I’ve seen the rise of several outstanding young student journalists. I’ve had the privilege of reading and editing great writing and like to think that I’ve made a big impact on several of the kids I’ve come in contact with.

Many of them have asked me in the past, “Wik, why don’t you write anymore?” Well, for a long time, I had nothing to write about. I’d moved on to teaching, stopped writing poetry, stopped journaling and didn’t work that part of my brain for some time. I hadn’t realized that my opinions were what I should be writing and that there was an outlet where my writing would have a home. That’s what this blog will become: a home for my (choose your cliché now) opinions. I’ll primarily discuss sports, but I can promise that life events and pop culture will inevitably be given their fair share of time.

I have to admit, that when blogging first appeared in our culture’s vocabulary, I was fairly offended by it, considering myself a journalist, trained and bred to investigate, report and inform. I saw bloggers as wannabes who couldn’t actually work for a paper or a legitimate news source and had no training. But alas, they decided to do what they wanted to but couldn’t and created a blog.

That’s when I coined my own catch phrase: “Those who can’t, blog.”

For years I panned bloggers for being self-absorbed creators of media that had no business doing what they were doing. I even slighted them in my media classes and encouraged my students to avoid websites without credentials, morals and AP style guides.

Now, after reading several blogs and seeing where digital media has been speeding, I realize the place for bloggers and feel that it is now a home where my writing can be nurtured and put out there for readers to see. There are still bloggers who create news or are more tabloid than journalism, but I can see the positives and see where the production of more unique content and the presence of more original voices are not just valuable, but welcome.

So, on “Scoreboard Watching” you’ll read about my opinions that may surprise you, like how I think the use of steroids is actually given a bad rap (coming soon in a blog). You may read about my displeasure with where sports is going or hear amazing stories that touch the hearts of sports fans and non-fans alike. I will attempt to treat this site like a column where I write two or three times a week. We’ll figure that out as we go, but I’m excited to get started and know that you will enjoy my first piece on the Mark McGwire admission and how it brings up important questions about the baseball hall of fame down the road. Look for that piece tomorrow.

So without further pomp and circumstance, let the watching begin…

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Filed under Bloggers, Education, Journalism